“LEE, MYSELF & I” AUTHOR WYNDHAM WALLACE – Song For Ewe

SONG FOR EWE

with WYNDHAM WALLACE, author “LEE, MYSELF & I”

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“SONG FOR EWE” is the feature where music peeps beloved by VELVET SHEEP choose an obscure song they’ve been listening to that day.

Today is someone with a truly personal connection to Velvet Sheep fanzine in that I slept drunkenly on the floor of their flat after a legendary coach trip to Manchester to see DJ Carhouse & MC Hellshit as part of Paul Smith (Blast First)’s Disobey club-night. Given that I had been sick on the coach, next to Russell Haswell and had it cleared up by Bruce Gilbert of the Wire, it was lucky that my friend and former plugger WYNDHAM WALLACE let me stay at all!

Wyndham used to send me records by and set up interviews with the likes of Swans, Jon Spencer Blues Explosion & Guided By Voices, and was an all round top bloke and mentor to a young wet behind the ears suburban punk. He later moved to Berlin, did all kinds of travel writing and became manager, and then friend to the legendary singer-songwriter, the hard-living Lee Hazlewood – most famous for his records with Nancy Sinatra, including the epochal “These Boots Are Made For Walking”.

Helping his hero Hazlewood return from the musical wilderness, Wyndham went from manager to friend and confidante to seeing him succumb to illness and death at a closer hand than he ever expected…and has captured the touching story in his first book “LEE, MYSELF & I – INSIDE THE VERY SPECIAL WORLD OF LEE HAZLEWOOD”.

I asked my fellow Quietus writer and friend to choose his “song for ewe” and surprisingly enough, it’s not his man, but a sneak into his next project:

Over to WW:

It’s Immaterial “Endless Holiday”

“Sometimes the most fascinating stories surround the least prominent people, precisely because their tales haven’t been told for years.

I’ve recently been obsessing over this Liverpool band from the 1980s (It’s Immaterial), who had one proper hit in 1986 with ‘Driving Away From Home (Jim’s Tune)’.

‘Endless Holiday’, though, is from their 1990 second album, Song, and is an intimate, desperately moving portrait of unemployment at the end of the Thatcher era. I’m currently working on a big feature about the band and it’s given me an excuse to immerse myself in what remains one of my favourite records of all time.”

THANKS TO WYNDHAM WALLACE.

“LEE, MYSELF & I” IS OUT NOW ON JAWBONE PRESS.

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Author: Nick Hutchings

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