“SONG FOR EWE” is the feature where artists & music people beloved by VELVET SHEEP choose an obscure song they’ve been listening to that day. Today’s guest has a startling piquant country-ish album out on Gerard Cosloy’s 12XU Records called “Big Fall”. As much Grand Theft Auto as Grand Theft Parsons, it’s what Gram chistened “Cosmic American Music” meets Gen Z, with its wide-eyed years-belied protagonist Sheridan Frances ‘Francie’ Medosch born some 28 years after Parsons death.

Francie musically speaking goes by the name of Florry (after a brief dalliance with the name Francie Cool) and she’s been raised in Philadelphia with three cats, a dog and a pig for company (no Velvet Sheep more’s the pity) and raised on the music of Gillian Welch and Wilco’s 2002 debut “Yankee Hotel Foxtrot” which was effectively Medosch’s year zero. She recorded a debut record in 2018, aged 17, called “Brown Bunny” on Sister Polygon. After 2019 recordings for a dark, angst ridden second album made in Willow, a hamlet in NY near Woodstock were shelved, Francie picked up the pen again during the pandemic, and despite the darkness of the times/and yet also perhaps because of them found a more expansive, happier framing. She embraced what she’s called “absurdist existentialism”, bemused by the ridiculousness of our helpless hurtle through this strange life, and combined with some revisited Willow recordings the results are brilliantly engaging.

Basically it’s the feel good/bad sleeper hit of the late summer (out in September in time for “Big Fall” I guess).  Welcome to VS, Francie Medosch aka Florry!

Here’s a Soundcloud link to “Older Girlfriend”…

…and should you want to learn it, why note eh?

Gotta love a pig on the artwork too right?

There’s plenty of curveballs on “Big Fall” including the Lou Barlow’s got happy title track, Fat Sam meets vaudeville music hall of “Say Your Prayers”, “Older Girlfriend” coming on like a cut from The Cure’s “Wish” and the outright avant pop disco meets Le Tigre of “Everyone I Love You” that could have seriously improved St. Vincent’s latest, not to mention the whistle solo at the end of stand out tune “Jane”. And for doom laden alt country purists there’s the almost spidery Elliott Smith scrawl of too close for comfort “Dream Diary/Growth”.

And Francie has unsurprisingly got great taste as her pick for our feature attests…so without further ado, here’s Francie Medosch’s “song for ewe”…

“She Might Look My Way”

Besides when they actually ended up later reforming, “Dusted in Memphis” might be the greatest post-Big Star affair for Alex Chilton. It’s trashy, it’s poppy, it’s belligerent, it’s ravishing; it’s Chilton’s “Tonight’s the Night” pretty much. For the most part, the album’s production leaves you wanting slightly more, but on “She Might Look My Way” it’s as perfect as ever and it creates such a hazy, spacey power pop atmosphere. There are a lot of moments in this song.

Right off the bat the opening descending riff coupled with the cheesy ascending bass slide lets you know this track is going to be a doozy. Then Alex’s dreamy vocals come in talking about some cursed girl (I assume Lesa Aldridge, who went on to marry Tommy Hoehn, the co-writer of this track) he needs to submit to (either her or some twisted idea of her) and his voice never fails to take me to a sensual connection with rocknroll. He builds up this beautiful infatuation, being afraid to turn on himself (turn on or turn on?), and then he just tears it down during the second pre-chorus when he reveals that he actually just needs ‘some-a-thing’ he can use. It’s great: it’s dreamy, it’s perverted, it’s Alex friggin’ Chilton. I wish I knew more about who plays on this record, but I’m sure many of these tracks are just Alex by himself, still carefully layering parts on like he did before the “Like Flies On Sherbert” sessions turned him into an anarchic wizard. – Francie Medosch”

THANKS TO FRANCIE AND TO GERARD COSLOY OF 12XU RECORDS

You can pre-order “Big Fall” on cassette/LP here at Bandcamp…(digitally out on 27 Aug, physical ships around 17 Sept).